Clean up the garbage in your life with healthy choices

Garbage in can turn you to rubble – change your choices

Clean up the garbage in your life with healthy choices
Garbage in your life leads to negative consequences.

You’ve heard, ‘garbage in – garbage out’. Wow, that holds true with our health, too. I want to focus on three particular types of garbage in our lives.

  1. Garbage food

I admit I am not the most healthy eater. But, I do try to make good choices most of the time. I have eaten enough healthy food to notice the impact of unhealthy food.

The other day I was at a meeting in an unfamiliar part of town. Time was tight as I left that meeting and went to teach a class. So, I opted for the fast food restaurant that I could see a couple of blocks down the road rather than search for some other quick food source. When I was growing up, and even earlier in our marriage, it was not uncommon to eat at this fast food chain. I had not eaten there now in a few years. I had a small burger and onion rings. It looked good, tasted, great, and went down easily. Then, within an hour, I felt queasy, bloated, and tired. I was surprised at how different I felt.

There is extensive evidence that our food choices impact our risks for diabetes, heart disease, high cholesterol, and maybe even dementia. Your brain, your veins and arteries, your heart, your kidneys, your liver, your eyes, your skin, your hair, your nails, and more parts of your body are impacted by what you eat.

If you have not seen it, I encourage you to watch the documentary, Super Size Me. I found it very eye opening about the dangers of frequent fast food.

Eating your largest portions with colorful fruits and vegetables, joined by a fist size piece of lean protein (e.g. meat such as lean chicken or fish), and some grains is ideal. You can find more detailed guidelines at Choose My Plate.

  1. Garbage media

What you see and what you hear have a big impact on what you think. Media plays a big part in our lives! Music, television, video games, and social media are huge general areas of so much content. The choices we make about our media help shape how we think, how we view the world, our ability to concentrate, or attention span, and our mood.

If you’re interested in the science linking music and our thoughts and actions, see this interesting article by a known expert on the subject, Dr. Bernard Luskin.

Media that promotes negativity, hate, and crime promotes such thoughts and activities. Pornography changes thinking, desires, and satisfaction. There is even an addiction associated with social media.

On the other hand, spending time with uplifting people, positive music, and other positive media can really brighten your day!

  1. Garbage relationships

Who in your life lets you know how valuable, appreciated, and loved you are? Keep those relationships!

If you have people in your life who feed you negative, demeaning, or other messages that kill your sense of self-worth and confidence, move away from those relationships. Surround yourself with the positive images of your immense value and lovability.

The messages you receive can impact how you see yourself. Stay around those who are the positive influences in your life.

Choose to replace your garbage with treasure

This is just a brief exploration of how garbage in can damage you. I encourage you to consider how you can replace the garbage. Consider the diet changes that will make you feel better, more energetic, less bloated, and give you more clear thinking. Consider how what you watch and hear could be more positive and uplifting. Consider how you could spend more time with people who lift you up.

To better understand how positive input will enhance your health, contact us at Meds MASH at 410-472-5078 or www.medsmash.com/contact.

BIBLICAL APPLICATION

Just like our physical and emotional health negatively respond to ‘garbage’, so does our spiritual health.

What are the sources of ‘garbage’ when it comes to our spiritual health?

False teachers

We are repeatedly warned in the Bible about people who will look legitimate but actually be teaching false information.

2 Timothy 3:5 ESV

Having the appearance of godliness, but denying its power. Avoid such people.

We are warned about times coming that will tempt us to turn away from God’s truth.

2 Timothy 4:3-4 ESV

For the time is coming when people will not endure sound teaching, but having itching ears they will accumulate for themselves teachers to suit their own passions, and will turn away from listening to the truth and wander off into myths.

Colossians 2:8 ESV

See to it that no one takes you captive by philosophy and empty deceit, according to human tradition, according to the elemental spirits of the world, and not according to Christ.

Temptations

We are surrounded by strong temptations. As we saw above, media and other social messages teach a message much different than God’s truth.

Galatians 5:16 ESV

But I say, walk by the Spirit, and you will not gratify the desires of the flesh.

1 Corinthians 15:33 ESV

Do not be deceived: “Bad company ruins good morals.”

Negativity in our society

2 Corinthians 12:20 ESV

For I fear that perhaps when I come I may find you not as I wish, and that you may find me not as you wish—that perhaps there may be quarreling, jealousy, anger, hostility, slander, gossip, conceit, and disorder.

Titus 3:10 ESV

As for a person who stirs up division, after warning him once and then twice, have nothing more to do with him,

So to avoid the ‘garbage’ that is all around you, follow God’s plan. In the midst of it all, keep this in mind.

Philippians 4:8 ESV

Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things.

Blessings,

Michelle

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Numbers: Do you know the importance of each of your numbers?

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Know how your numbers are key to your health.

What are the key numbers in your life? I just turned 50. That is a number that seems like a real turning point. I like a viewpoint a friend shared with me: the first half-century is training and preparation for the better half!

Also, my daughter is graduating from high school. So, in her world the key numbers are GPA, SAT, ACT, and college fees.

Other numbers we keep close to us are phone numbers, bank balances, addresses, and birthdays.

Numbers and Health

Now I want to make sure you are aware of key numbers for your health. There is a reason for those labs at your annual physical. And there are goals for those numbers. When you see your lab results you will see your number and a range that contains all of the normal numbers. Ideally, your number falls in this range. If your numbers are little bit outside this ‘normal range’ for a little while, just talk with your doctor. If your numbers stay outside the range, your doctor will probably take action with medication, exercise changes, diet changes, or other plans.

Blood pressure – If you are under age 65, normal is less than 140/90. If you are over 65, some experts agree it’s ok for your systolic blood pressure (top number) to get as high as 150. Your blood pressure is one indicator of how hard your heart has to work. There are several medications that can be used to lower your blood pressure and protect your heart from having to work too hard. I am often asked about how low is too low for your blood pressure. That is not really determined by a number. It is found through symptoms. If you get really dizzy when you stand up, turn around, or try to walk faster, talk with your doctor. A little bit of this is expected with the medicines that are protecting your heart. If it is causing you to fall or keeping you from doing your normal activities, then let your healthcare team know.

Pulse – This is usually between 60 and 90 beats per minute. You can quickly check your own by touching the center of your neck and letting your fingertips slide to the soft area just to the side. Your carotid artery is there, and you can count the beats for 15 seconds then multiple by 4. The more you exercise, the more efficient your heart gets. So, really fit people tend to be at the bottom of this range. This should be measured when you are really at rest. If you are worried, in pain, stressed out, or in a conversation your heart rate will be higher. So, when this is measured, think quiet thoughts and don’t talk. If it gets and stays high, your doctor will order some more tests to check why. The same is true if your heart rate is slower than 60 beats per minute. Tests will be ordered to see what your heart is doing to cause the slow rate.

Cholesterol – We all have cholesterol, or fats, in our blood. This is normal. But there are healthy amounts and unhealthy amounts. These are the key numbers. For most people, your low density lipoproteins (LDL) number should ideally be under 100 mg/dL. If you have a strong history of heart disease, your doctor might have you try to reach an even lower goal. This is your ‘bad cholesterol’. Your high density lipoproteins (HDL) is your ‘good cholesterol’. Ideally you want this number to be over 40 mg/dL. Another cholesterol number is your triglycerides. This tends to go up if you have diabetes that isn’t well controlled. This number should be less than 150 mg/dL. Diet, exercise, and medications are all key in keeping these numbers in the goal range if you have high cholesterol (also called hyperlipidemia).

Blood sugar – Speaking of diabetes, this is a very important number for people with diabetes. It is important whether you have type 1 (requires insulin) or type 2 diabetes (can be treated with medicines you take by mouth, by inhalation, or by injection). Your blood sugar changes throughout the day. It is usually lowest before a meal and highest after. When you have not eaten for at least 8 hours, your blood sugar should be less than 100 mg/dL. (This is a ‘fasting blood glucose’.) Your healthcare team might ask you to measure your blood sugar at home. There are several types of monitors to do this. They might want you to check sometimes before you eat, sometimes after you eat, sometimes before bed, and sometimes when you first wake up. This will give them the best look at what your blood sugar does throughout the day.

Glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c) – This is another way to see what your blood sugar does over a period of time – about 3 months. It is a reflection of your average blood sugar over those months. People who do not have diabetes have an A1c under 6%. Current guidelines encourage a goal of less than 6.5% for people with diabetes. However, if someone is at risk for their blood sugar being too low your doctor might increase this goal closer to 7%. When people with diabetes also have other medical conditions, sometimes ‘tight control’ to under 6.5% is not possible or safe. Talk with your healthcare team for your specific goal and why that is the goal for you.

Body Mass Index (BMI) – This measurement is a reflection of your height, your weight, and your gender. It helps to define what is a healthy weight for you. The goal BMI is between 18.5 and 24.9. If your BMI is 25 to 29.9 you are overweight. If it is over 30 then you are obese. Your healthcare team will help you with a plan to get to a healthy weight and stay in that healthy range.

Blood Urea Nitrogen and Serum Creatinine (BUN and SCr) – These are important measures of your kidneys. They determine if your kidneys are clearing extra fluid, medications, and toxins from your body as they should. They can also tell your doctor if you are dehydrated from not drinking enough. As a pharmacist, I always look at these numbers when deciding if a medication is safe and at the right dose. When your kidneys are not working as they should, then it is hard to get some medications back out of the body. Another interesting numbers – Our kidneys start to very gradually slow down when we are in our late 30’s or early 40’s. This happens to everyone. So, with each birthday in our 50’s and beyond, these are important numbers to assess.

Aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase (AST and ALT) – These are measures of how your liver is working. Many medications are metabolized (broken down) in the liver. If these numbers are very high, then the liver is not able to do its job to break down the medication. These are numbers I always look at when evaluating someone’s medication regimen. It helps determine what medicines should be avoided and what doses are best for you based on your liver.

Number of Medications – Sometimes several medications are needed to treat all of your medical conditions. Sometimes they are not. The more medications someone takes, the more risk of medications interacting and causing problems rather than helping them. There is no ‘magic number’, but most experts agree that taking more than 4 medications regularly means you need to have an expert very carefully evaluate your regimen. This is to double check that your medication regimen is providing optimal good with minimal risk.

An Evaluation of YOUR Numbers

Are you curious about your numbers? At Meds MASH we specialize in these evaluations, especially in anyone over age 60. Do you want to better understand your particular numbers? Do want to know that your medicines are providing optimal good and minimal risk? Call us today! We have found that over 50% of our clients need a medication adjustment once an expert evaluation is done. These adjustments come from your own doctor with our collaboration.

You can call for your appointment at 410-472-5078 or e-mail at michelle@medsmash.com or through our website www.medsmash.com/contact.

BIBLICAL APPLICATION

Have you read the entire Bible? I am on my second journey through the whole book. In the past I have read my favorite parts, read parts pertaining to Bible studies I was in, or read parts that others have recommended. After years of this focused reading, I thought I knew the Bible fairly well. But, here I am reading it all and learning so many new things!

I was recently working my way through the book of Numbers. I have to admit, I don’t find this to be the most exciting book. It can be downright hard to get through. But, I was hit by a new insight.

In Numbers God directed Moses through the exact, meticulous details of building the temple and the Ark of the Covenant.

  • He provided exact measurement for each aspect of the temple.
  • He described elements of the temple in extreme detail.
  • He gave exact specifications for each furnishing.
  • Each bowl and utensil was described in detail.
  • The role of each person in service to the temple was directed.
  • The clothing of each priest was designed to the last thread.

It hit me how incredibly precise is our God. Not any detail was left with precise design. God is perfect in every way.

Then, I thought about how sloppy I am in my communication with God. I pray, read my Bible, focus when I find the time. I squeeze God into the nooks and crannies of my day. Some days are much better than others. Even now as I am reading through the Bible in a year, I find myself rushing rather than deeply meditating on what I read.

Sloppy is NOT what God wants from me. He is more important than ANYTHING else in my life. My to-do lists, dirty house, and work schedule are not the priorities per God’s plan. They are the distractions. They are Satan’s best weapon to keep me away from a deep, life-sustaining life with my Creator.

How about you? Is your relationship with God truly all-in? What are your distractions?

Paul knew we would all face these distractions and temptations.

1 Corinthians 10:13 ESV

No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it.

Paul also knew we wouldn’t do it just because anyone said so. Rather we are encouraged to stay focused on God to find and lead the life of peace and joy that is ours if we choose this path.

1 Corinthians 7:35 ESV

I say this for your own benefit, not to lay any restraint upon you, but to promote good order and to secure your undivided devotion to the Lord.

I pray we can all keep striving to keep God at the center as in the words of David:

Psalm 19:14 ESV

Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in your sight, O Lord, my rock and my redeemer.

Blessings to you my sloppy but trying to be better friends!

Michelle

Medication Reconciliation – Why it’s important to you

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Medication reconciliation can keep you safe.

Have you heard the term ‘medication reconciliation’? Probably not, it’s an insider’s term within medicine. But it’s an important concept, and I want you to know about it. I want you to ask about it any time you find yourself going into the hospital, going to the emergency department (ED), coming out of the hospital, going into rehab, switching doctors, having any major changes in either your health or who is monitoring your medications.

The term medication reconciliation (abbreviated ‘med rec’) means taking your whole medication list and understanding, how you are taking it and when you are taking. It is about making sure that information goes with you any time you are making a transition. So ideally, at the moment you enter a hospital someone figures out exactly what you take, how you take it, and when you take it. It is awesome if you come with this information. You could carry that information with you and have it ready to share with your health team. It is a huge safety factor in your care. If they know exactly what you take, how you take it, when you take it, they will make much more informed decisions in your care. This is true in the emergency department, the hospital, moving to rehab, moving to assisted living. I applaud the pharmacists who do this well in hospitals, clinics, and other settings around the country.

If you come in with it ready, you have saved them a lot of time and effort. And, you’ve helped assure your own safety. This important information will help guide the next phase when they will make any modification depending on why you are in the health system and what your needs are at that time.

If you’re in the ED or the hospital for a particular reason, there may very well be a need for a new medication to treat the reason you’re there. It is important that any of those changes are communicated all throughout your stay within and beyond the health system.

Formulary

A little caveat that’s important is another important term to understand – formulary. There can be a number of different medicines that do the same thing. We call them medication classes, and each class could have several medications that do the same thing in the same way. Rather than carry every medication on the market, a hospital will carry a few in each category.   It is possible that the one you typically take is not on their formulary. They will switch you while you are in the hospital to one that is on their formulary. The name, color, and size might not look familiar to you. Be sure to ask questions when you don’t recognize your medicine. This is not harmful; it will not put you in danger. Medicines within the same class work the same way as the one your doctor had you on at home. But, it is a source of confusion when you go home or move to another part of the health system. It’s one of the reasons this medication reconciliation process is so important.

It is critical that you know that another medication, similar to the one you take at home, is being used in the hospital. You want, when you go home, to be switched back to the medicine you came in on, the one that was prescribed by your own primary care provider.

Many, many patients have run into difficulty when they go home on the medication the hospital gave them and they continue to take the one they have at home. This is called duplication of therapy. You are getting twice the amount you need – you have the one you have at home and the on the hospital gave you that do the exact same thing. So, using blood pressure as an example, if you are taking the medicine you have at home plus the one in the same class that you got in the hospital, you could lower your blood pressure too much. You want to avoid duplication of therapy; be sure for that class of medicine you are on just one.

Be sure to ask at the hospital if you can go back on the one you were familiar with at home that does the same thing as the one you got while in the hospital.

It is important that several people know exactly the medicines you take when you go back home or get to your next destination. You are one of them, of course. It is also important that anyone involved in your care such as your spouse, child, or caregiver involved in your care; your primary care doctor; any specialists; and your pharmacist know exactly how your medications have changed while you were in the hospital.

It is important that any intermediate step before you go home, such as rehabilitation, knows your entire current medication regimen. But, it is most important that you understand exactly what to take when you get home.

Medication changes while you’re in the hospital

What if problems related to your medication led to you going to the hospital? That is very often the case. Then, the medicines that led to your admission will be stopped or changed. If the problem that took you to the hospital was something new, then it’s likely that new medicines were added to your regimen. Again, it is important that you know what changes were made, why they were made, and exactly what you should do when you get back home. Ideally, ask your questions while you’re in the hospital, but if you get home and have questions, don’t hesitate to reach out for answers.

Medication reconciliation is something we often do at Meds MASH. People get home and realize they don’t really understand what they are to do. They have a list from the hospital, a list from rehab, and their home list. They wonder if anyone has looked at all of the medicines – the old ones, the new ones, and some from other doctors.   At Meds MASH we look at all of the medicines and make sure they are all safe together. We catch those duplications and clear them up with your doctors. One of the things we will do, with your permission, is get information from all of your doctors and from the hospital and pull it all together. Then, after the thorough analysis, any changes will come from your primary care doctor who is the gatekeeper and the one person responsible for all of your medicines.

Three doctors recently wrote an important article about the need for accurate medication reconciliation. And they note that this process must be thorough to be meaningful. Several partial versions have been tried, and if it isn’t complete, it’s not helpful. It’s not going to keep people safe if it is not done right.

If a thorough medication reconciliation can keep you safe and healthy, please contact us at Meds MASH at 410-472-5078 or www.medsmash.com/contact.

BIBLICAL APPLICATION

This Biblical application might feel a little less associated with the health part. With medication reconciliation we are talking about making sure all of the information related to medication use is clearly communicated. If it is not done completely it isn’t effective. What about our compassion and how we reach out to others? How complete and effective are we?

Something has been weighing very heavy on my mind in the last week. It is the decisions we make about where our compassion lies. Who we can forgive and who we can’t. How do we spend our money and give our support and where we do we not? The thought that has been raised in my mind is – when we know someone is in need, and we do not know their sins, it seems to me it is easier to reach out and provide support for those needs. The example that got me thinking this is the refugee crisis. When you know there are millions of people who have been displaced, a lot of people have compassion for that and for their circumstances. What can we do to help those people and their dire circumstances?

The other things that made me think of this were more local. What are the needs of people who are making choices that are leading them to being in dire circumstances? It might be behavioral and lifestyle choices; it might be financial management choices; it could be self-care choices that lead them to circumstances where their life is not as secure as it might be. Their difficult circumstances are a ramification of lifestyle and self-satisfaction choices they have made.

I am connected to a place right now that serves the LGBTQ community and the HIV population. Some Christians find it easy to be very judgmental of this population and not share their compassion in this direction. Rather, they choose to share their compassion in other circumstances where the reasons and the choices are less known. Is this what Christ calls us to do? Are we called to show compassion or walk away?

Consider the story of the woman caught in adultery in Luke Chapter 8.

Luke 8:1-11 MSG

 Jesus went across to Mount Olives, but he was soon back in the Temple again. Swarms of people came to him. He sat down and taught them.

The religion scholars and Pharisees led in a woman who had been caught in an act of adultery. They stood her in plain sight of everyone and said, “Teacher, this woman was caught red-handed in the act of adultery. Moses, in the Law, gives orders to stone such persons. What do you say?” They were trying to trap him into saying something incriminating so they could bring charges against him.

Jesus bent down and wrote with his finger in the dirt. They kept at him, badgering him. He straightened up and said, “The sinless one among you, go first: Throw the stone.” Bending down again, he wrote some more in the dirt.

Hearing that, they walked away, one after another, beginning with the oldest. The woman was left alone. Jesus stood up and spoke to her. “Woman, where are they? Does no one condemn you?”

“No one, Master.”

“Neither do I,” said Jesus. “Go on your way. From now on, don’t sin.”

Her choices were well known, and she was being very degraded. She was called before the council having been caught in the act.   The council members were ready to stone her. Jesus said those without sin could cast the first stone. We are so quick to categorize sins, but it doesn’t seem Jesus categorizes sins. What are we called to do as Christians? I am struggling with this and I’m challenging others to struggle with this, too. This is not a blog with answers. It is a blog with challenging questions. I would love to hear what people think.

Luke 6:37 ESV

“Judge not, and you will not be judged; condemn not, and you will not be condemned; forgive, and you will be forgiven;

It has become clear to me as a practitioner that sex as defined in the Bible, as designed by God does not lead to trauma, whether emotional or physical, and it does not lead to disease transmission or to promiscuity.

But in society, especially in the current waive of rules avoidance and focus on self, sex is being used in a lot of other ways. When used outside the way described by God, it does lead to a lot of issues. We create our own problems when we are outside this definition.

Another example heavy on my mind is substance abuse. The numbers of people caught in addiction and dying of overdose are astounding. This is a tragedy of great proportion! Yet the local rescue mission is struggling to stay funded. People who have been caught up in abuse and addiction who are now reaching out for help to leave that lifestyle are encountering limited spots available for rehabilitation. Yet Christians are looking for meaningful outreach and missions opportunities.

I am in full support of refugee aid, international response to crisis, local response to crisis, support of children in underserved areas, teens on mission trips, college students on mission trips, medical missions, and so much more. In addition to all of this wonderful outreach, I encourage us to search our hearts and God’s leading for our attitudes about reaching those in circumstances in our own community that are harming them.

I propose when we limit our compassion or draw a line for how we will consider using our resources, it is similar to an incomplete medication review.  Completeness and effectiveness are limited.

James 4:12 ESV

There is only one lawgiver and judge, he who is able to save and to destroy. But who are you to judge your neighbor?

What is your response?

Blessings,

Michelle