Flu or Cold – What do you take with high blood pressure?

‘Tis the season of flu, cough, and colds. I’ll be surprised if you don’t know someone with one of these right now. There are many products lining the shelves of the pharmacies and grocery stores ready to treat your symptoms.

If you have high blood pressure or a heart condition

Does it matter which product you choose to treat your symptoms if you have high blood pressure, heart failure, have had a heart attack, or you have some other heart condition? Actually, it does. Most of the products used to treat your cold or flu contain two main ingredients: decongestant and antihistamine.

Decongestants decrease the swelling of the lining of your nose. When these swell, you feel stuffy and have trouble breathing through your nose. Taking one while you have a cold or flu can help you breath better and relieve that stuffed-up feeling. Decongestants can be found in tablets, capsules, nasal sprays, nose drops, and liquids. They are often found in combination with other medicines for fever, headache, cough, sore throat, and mucous.

Decongestants work by increasing your sympathetic system. This is the part of your system that kicks in to gear when you are angry or afraid. It is called the ‘fight or flight’ response. It also causes your heart to beat harder and faster.   Your veins and arteries get tighter. Your blood pressure goes up.

If you have high blood pressure or heart disease, this is not helpful. It puts you at risk of worse heart disease or even heart attack or stroke.

Antihistamines block histamine. This helps to dry up a runny nose, tearing of your eyes, sneezing, and itching in your nose and eyes. They are helpful with these symptoms for allergies or for colds/flu. They come in tablets, capsules, liquid, eye drops, and nasal spray. Some of the antihistamines (first generation) cause you to be sleepy and slow your thinking. The newer, second generation versions have fewer of these side effects, but they can still make you sleepy. Be very careful if you must drive while taking these.

Antihistamines should also be taken with caution with people in high blood pressure or heart disease.

The cold and flu medicines on the market for people with high blood pressure leave out the decongestant. They have the antihistamine and usually acetaminophen for fever. So, still be careful using these if you have high blood pressure. Check your blood pressure while you are taking them. Let your doctor know what you are taking for your cold and flu.

So, if most of the cough and cold and flu medicines on the market are not good for your heart or blood pressure, what should you do?

What can you do without taking cold and flu medicines?

For your fever, take acetaminophen. Medicines like ibuprofen (brand names Motrin, Advil) or naproxen (brand name Aleve) can raise your blood pressure and increase your risk of heart disease.

For your congestion, try a humidifier. Moist, warm or cool air can help break up the mucous and ease your swollen nasal passages.

Get plenty of rest so your body’s immune system can fight the virus. Drink plenty of fluid.

With or without a decongestant or antihistamine your cold or flu is likely to last about 5-7days.

Wash your hands, especially after being out in public. When you are in public or haven’t washed your hands recently, avoid touching your face (mouth, nose, eyes). And finally, please get your flu shot each year!

For more information about managing a cold or the flu with high blood pressure, please contact us at www.medsmash.com.

BIBLICAL APPLICATION

When you have high blood pressure or a heart condition, your treatment options for a cold or the flu are limited. To avoid letting your blood pressure get even higher, you need to carefully select a treatment that is best for you and your specific medical conditions.

Similarly, in your faith walk, what is best for you might not be best for someone else.

Paul mentioned this in at least two of his letters. After Christ came to reconcile us with God, the rules of the past changed. But, this was easier to accept for some people than for others. In particular, new believers found this transition to be confusing sometimes.

So Paul encouraged all believers to consider their friends and neighbors when making decisions. If something would cause confusion for someone else, then Paul encourages us to not do that thing.

Romans 14:13 ESV

Therefore let us not pass judgment on one another any longer, but rather decide never to put a stumbling block or hindrance in the way of a brother.

1 Corinthians 8:13 ESV

Therefore, if food makes my brother stumble, I will never eat meat, lest I make my brother stumble.

1 Corinthians 8:9 ESV

But take care that this right of yours does not somehow become a stumbling block to the weak.

These verses make even more sense in context, so I encourage you to read them within their chapter.

Remember those around you when making decisions. It is easy to get caught up in your own life and not even think about how your actions impact others. Even when you are making ‘good’ decisions, realize other people younger in their faith might not understand your freedoms and reasons for exercising those freedoms.

Blessings,

Michelle

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s